Where are your community’s young adults?

As my colleagues and I have been criss-crossing the country, visiting with Jewish communities of all sizes, we hear a common refrain: Where are the young adults?

Whether the communities we speak to have an active young adult engagement strategy or not, there is always a sense there are a large number of young adults who are totally unknown to the Jewish community. When pressed, community professionals have a pretty good sense of how young adults are finding their way to the city, but it is the rare community that has created a strategy to leverage these avenues for connection. Below are a few examples and how best to identify and access the pipelines bringing young adults to your community.

Major Companies Located in Your City

The top five major employers in your city are also likely the top five locations of young adults, including Jewish young adults.  It is also highly likely that there are synagogue members or federation donors in higher-level positions in these companies. These people can help you make the inroads into the company’s HR and employee attachment/engagement infrastructure. A good HR professional understands the importance of employee engagement on reducing turnover.

Have a conversation with someone in HR about how the Jewish community can serve those employees who identify as Jewish, and in doing so, help the company’s talent management process. Ideally, it becomes part of the on-boarding process to inform employees of opportunities to connect to community beyond work, and suddenly you have a new pipeline of recently arrived young adults.

Graduate Programs and Residencies

We’re a people who place a high value on education, and you’ll still find a sizable number of Jewish young adults in graduate programs and medical residencies. In fact, 25% of American Jews hold a graduate degree, compared with 6% the general American population. Try reaching out to the dean of graduate students or community engagement to start the conversation about connecting with their Jewish students. Again, your main selling point is that you can provide the type of community that can prevent burnout and potentially help root a person locally.

Teach for America, and Similar Programs

There are now a number of programs like AmeriCorps, Teach for America, and Venture for America that are bringing college graduates into cities across the country. It is always worth connecting with these groups, particularly with their local chapters, as they tend to attract Jewish young adults (at least 10% of TFA corps members self-identify as Jewish). The burnout rate can be quite high in these programs, so make sure to stress that the sense of community you can offer can help provide the support network to keep people focused, positive, and productive. For more on how to engage local, Jewish Teach for America corp members, check out Rabbi Adam Grossman’s post here.

Now What?

Now that you know where to find young Jewish adults, what should you do next? Here are some tips that will help make your initial outreach a success, a crucial step for building a strong relationship down the line. Don’t forget, you have something to offer people, and to your city;  Citizens’ sense of community attachment is  linked with a city’s GDP growth. For more suggestions, program ideas, or feedback, you can always connect to us, @BI_NEXT or to me, @yonisarason.